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Tag: sustainable

Building Tribal Communities’ Energy Independence with Indigenized Energy Initiative

Native communities have disproportionately low access to and pay higher rates for utilities, particularly electricity, which has a significant impact on access and opportunities for remote work, education, and other activities. The Indigenized Energy Initiative works to increase indigenous energy ownership and access in order to address the social, economic, and environmental injustices that native communities face. This week, Chéri Smith, founder and CEO of IEI, discusses their strategy for assisting indigenous communities and eliminating energy poverty.

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How do Oyster Reefs Protect Shorelines with Claire Arre

Oysters can be a valuable environmental solution for shoreline restoration. Oyster reefs can support hundreds of marine species, improve water quality and protect against erosion and storm surges. Oysters also helps stabliize sediments and wave energy, which aids in the reduction of coastal erosion and the effects of sea-level rise. This week, listen to Claire Arre, Marine Restoration Director at Orange County Coastkeepers about how to use native oysters and eelgrass to bolster shorelines from the impacts of climate change.

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Carbon Farming with Ian Howell

Studies show that using cover crops in combination with other soil management practices can really increase the soil biomass and soil carbon. It’s good for the crop system, farm operation, carbon sequestration and management. Ian Howell, a resource conservationist with the Alameda County Resource Conservation District will explain why the techniques can reduce and remove the carbon emissions associated with agriculture.

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Climate 101 – S1E1: Lessons from California: Where we’ve gone wrong that other states can learn from, as well as where we’ve gone right

“Climate 101” is a new roundtable podcast that our show producer, Ethan Elkind, will talk to different experts to get the basics on various climate topics in each episode. This time, the guest is California’s trailblazing climate leaders Mary Nichols, Louise Bedsworth, and Aimee Barnes and they will talk about lessons from California: Where we’ve gone wrong that other states can learn from, as well as where we’ve gone right.

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How Policy Change Boosts Electric Vehicle Transformation in Europe with Laurence Tubiana – California China Climate Institute

The European Union has recently seen a significant transformation in the market for electric vehicles. Nearly 1,325,000 electric car registrations in 2020 has been reported which is an 11% increase in registration from 2019. Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation, indicated that there are still hurdles for people who looks for switching to electric cars in a California China Climate Institute discussion. This week, listen to Tubiana about policies to boost this transformation.

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Shifting to Renewable Energy with Hal Harvey – California China Climate Institute

What are the top ways that California can shift to renewable energy more quickly and reach zero emissions by 2050? Former California Governor Jerry Brown spoke with Hal Harvey, CEO of Energy Innovation, for a California China Climate Institute discussion.

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Recycling with Deborah Raphael

Many “recyclable” materials are not recycled or even recyclable. While papers and metals are recycled at relatively high rates, recycling rates for plastic are below 10 percent. Most plastics display numerical codes, purporting to denote a standardized and elaborate recycling system. But the system is convoluted, sometimes confusing even recycling facilities and identifying recycling processes that are not used.

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Urban Farming with Paul Bernstein

Urban Farming is one solution to agricultural emissions. Approximately 30 percent of Greenhouse Gas emissions are from agriculture and the food system, so finding ways to drastically reduce emissions is in this sector is key. Urban farms often feed local residents, which eliminates much of the emissions produced by transportation. They are also often farmed agroecologically, which is a kind of agriculture that promotes environmentally sustainable and socially just farming practices.

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